Friday, 4 May 2012

Burglary at Chavenage House, Glos, 26 April

PLEASE FORWARD DETAILS AND IMAGES TO ANY CONTACTS WHO ARE HISTORIC HOUSE OWNERS OR CUSTODIANS OF COLLECTIONS, CERAMICS CONSERVATORS, AUCTIONEERS, VALUERS, DEALERS OR COLLECTORS.

ANY INFORMATION WHICH MIGHT LEAD TO THE RETRIEVAL OF THE ITEMS OR ABOUT THE CRIME ITSELF SHOULD BE RELAYED TO MIKE PRENTICE AT GLOUCESTERSHIRE POLICE mike.prentice@gloucestershire.pnn.police.uk THE CRIME REFERENCE NUMBER IS 10317-12

Items taken include:

OAK ROOM
A George II simulated tortoiseshell bracket clock, the bell topped case enclosing an eight-day fusee movement with verge escapement and an engraved black plate, the arched brace face with a strike/silent and seconds subsidiary dials flanking the maker's label, Robt. and Pet. Higgs, London, the silvered chapter ring enclosing a false pendulum and calendar aperture, height 1'6'.

Contents of a China Cabinet
· A pair of circular two-handled ice pail, covers and liners circa 1820, each piece painted with shaped reserves of sailors in and around a hour on a gilded green ground, one handle repaired 9in (2)
· A pair of Dresden candlesticks, one decorated with seated boy with garlanded hair, a flowered pink cloak, holding festoon of flowers, the other with seated girl, her hair garlanded with vine leaves, wearing flowered blue robe and holding a basket of fruits. Both on circular panelled stands and leaning against tree trunk on which is set the candleholder. Height 7" and 7 1/4" respectively
· Other contents of the cabinet, including a Japanese ovoid bulbous bottle vase c1880 and Sevres style coffee can and saucer.
 

A pair of oval miniature portraits on ivory, c1780 of John Lowsley and Mary Lowsley, gilt frames. A group of four family miniature portraits, early 19th Century, of a young man, his wife and their two children.

 


BILLIARD ROOM
 
A George IV mahogany sarcophagus cellaret circa 1825, the flattened pyramidal lid carved with fruit, above a panelled body on paw feet. 1'11" by 2' 10" and a Regency elm and rosewood parquetry games table, circa 1820, the moulded square top inlaid for Nine Men's Morris, with successive bands of figured wood, above a frieze drawer on a square banded stem and concave square platform with paw feet, 2' 4" by 1'10" (top only visible in photograph). A 19th century ormolu and porcelain mantle clock by P.H. Moury. The enamelled face with flying cupid centrepiece and numeral panels on bleu de roi ground, in arched frame, inset arcadian landscape panel, with ormolu ribbon cresting and laurel swags, supported by flanking pillars on shaped plinth with floral inset panel and surmounted by porcelain urn with ormolu swags. 15"x 9".

Thursday, 3 May 2012

After 200 years, demolished to make way for a taxi turning circle


Carmarthenshire County Council, having granted itself permission, has just demolished a row of ordinary late Georgian buildings, which contributed positively to the Llanelli streetscape, in order to make way for a taxi rank turning circle for the new East Gate leisure development. 




 







 




 




















The buildings formed the corner of Park Street and Island Place - 24 Park Street to 2 Island Place. Among the oldest streets in Llanelli, Park Street and Island Place were the original route into the town for mail coaches running between Swansea and Carmarthen. An old coaching inn, 'Ty Melyn', still exists in Park Street. The buildings were largely unaltered and were the best examples of early commercial properties in the town. The original shop here, The Llanelly Clog, Boot and Shoe Manufactory, was the region's largest clog maker and supplied local colliers and tinplate workers.


In a press statement that made no reference to objections to the scheme from amenity societies and others, the local authority said: "A short line of cottages off Upper Park Street offered little resistance to bulldozers clearing the way for the dawning of the £25million East Gate development. The removal of the buildings is one of the last stages of clearance work heralding the new East Gate destined to become a mecca for family entertainment boosting the town’s economy and fortunes later this year. Known in recent years at the CopyTech buildings, the old stone and brick cottages were fully architecturally surveyed and found to have little or no merit other than being photographically recorded for posterity. Contractors said they were poorly constructed and collapsed in little more than 30 minutes with little encouragement '.

Wednesday, 2 May 2012

Friends hope Gothic Hall reopening will herald 'great revival' of Elvaston Castle


ELVASTON Castle's Gothic Hall, designed by Lewis Cottingham in 1831 for the 4th Earl of Harrington, is to be opened to the public once more.

The Grade II* listed castle in Derbyshire has been closed since it was last used as a wedding venue in 2007.​ £36,500 has been spent making the hall compliant with fire regulations by putting in place a new fire alarm system.


A council spokeswoman said: "Public viewing days will be held several times a year. And the Gothic Hall is now available for hire – providing a unique setting for meetings, workshops and events."


The authority says it wants to find someone to take over the upkeep of the castle and its grounds because the £700,000 a year upkeep costs are not affordable. It is waiting to hear from the National Trust about whether the organisation is able to take over the grounds before tendering for takeover bids after the last proposal – to turn it into an hotel and golf course – failed. Campaign group The Friends of Elvaston Castle is seeking to keep the building in public hands.


A spokesman said he hoped opening the Gothic Hall to the public would signal "the beginning of a great revival for the property. It is obviously excellent news that the council has now managed to overcome its previous problems regarding fire regulations and is reopening the Gothic Hall for public events. We believe further revenue could also be earned by opening up other areas in the castle and that the demand for these could surprise the council". From The Derby Telegraph.